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RachelPotter last won the day on June 3 2015

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About RachelPotter

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  1. Dolphin planks really strengthened my shoulders and core for forearm balances. And I love the zombie press headstand too, nothing better than having a little fun with core work!
  2. I would recommend The Daily Bandha if you are looking for a more anatomical medically researched explanation of poses. Written by a doctor and long time yoga practioner, I find his explanations useful for my own teaching. He has a 5 step "process" that he applies to poses, called the Daily Bandha Codex. He also references the research articles that he uses. Hope that helps! http://www.dailybandha.com
  3. Does anyone have any tips on using mirroring when teaching? I find it to be one of the more difficult aspects of teaching. I do practice it, but never have been one to know my right from my left.
  4. Personally I do not find yoganonamous to be a quality source of information. I do feel like that article was made to be incendiary. Much like the backlash against the Briohny Smyth Equinox video and Kathryn Budig's Toe Sox ads. Both of which I find incredibly beautiful and artistic. I enjoy seeing poses done by all different bodies, not just the "perfect" ones. I find selfies to be inspiring, I like to see progress and feel the sense of accomplishment with those I follow and encourage. Instagram gives everyone that opportunity to feel the empowerment that accomplishment can bring. Social media can give us two options. You can choose to fuel the judgment and hate and alienate people, or you can choose to be a part of an accepting and supportive community. I choose community. And by choosing community, I feel the responsibility to post yoga selfies that I hope will inspire someone in their own journey (and a little self promotion as a teacher). Shaming anyone based on their size, whether skinny or not, does not contribute to the type of community I want to belong to. Thank you Candace for creating one of those supportive communities I want to be a part of. So selfie on if that feels right for you!
  5. What a great idea, as a fairly new teacher I find myself searching for the right cue for the right student. I can't wait to see some cue suggestions here. While teaching, I try and run through 2-3 verbal cues for the same thing. Sometimes what works for one person (a visualization) doesn't work for those who are more anatomically inclined (like me). I might say "lift the heart" and also "expand the chest toward the ceiling". I try to keep a balance of those visualization cues and body specific cues so that everyone gets what they need. Cues are more often than not specific to an individual, it depends on their background and how they interpret them. There are a couple of cues that I find work in general, most of the time: 1. "Lengthen the midline of the body running from the top of the head down the spine through the floor". For the visualization I refer to "a beam of light shining from the crown to the root" (I may have made reference to a light saber at some point ). This works to bring that spine into alignment in both seated and most standing poses. It also works to "hug to the midline" in downdog (sort of the same cue about the elbows above), planks, Chaturanga, lunges and other balancing poses. 2. "Engage the fingers/toes" or "energize the hands/draw the toes toward you" helps to keep the muscles of the arms engaged (lessens the impact on shoulders/rotator cuff) and legs (protects the knee when the hip is in turnout, and while standing engaging the quads will keep you from locking out the knee). I also remind everyone, including myself at the beginning of any practice, "honor your body where it is today, it may be different than where you were yesterday and it will be different from where you will be tomorrow". I think we, myself included, often forget what there is nothing our practice "should" look like. I agree, deepening your practice by finding those subtle muscles is way more rewarding!