Naamly

Finding right yoga teacher

6 posts in this topic

Hello everybody,

I am trying to introduce my son, who is a high performing athlete, to Yoga.


With different styles and forms of yoga, I was wondering what are a couple of things I should look for in a Yoga teacher before I decide on a teacher for him? 
Should I look at their expertise, i.e yeas of experience, safety(don't want any injuries as it can impact his career), service?
How do I compare Yoga teachers in an unbiased and informative way?

Thanks

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Hm, that's tricky as I do yoga at home. I'm sure @YogaByCandace would have a lot to say about this, but from my experiences in dealing with a variety of activities and sports, we often asked friends and family who we knew did that activity/sport where they went. That provided a good base line for us. When I became interested in horseback riding and we found out I was too old for the summer camp at CEL (a NFP for developmental disorders), I looked around for equine lessons for people with developmental disorders in my area. Not only was the first search result the place I wanted to go, but it turned out that's where all the kids from CEL go to for summer camp. If you know any NFPs, especially for things like developmental disorders, and they have a yoga program (most do!), ask if they go somewhere and where they go. Most NFPs will give you that info from a phone call or even just online. 

The most important thing I can personally stress is don't force yoga on him! I remember having so many things pushed on me and I grew to hate them and some were meant to be calming. You may even want to try some of Candace's fabulous YT videos before committing to trying out actual classes. She has a variety of types of yoga (vinyasa, yin, hatha, and some others) so your son can try them out for free!

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There is no right answer to your question. 

One could also ask  "what should I look for in a mate?" You'll get a hundred different answers from a hundred different people, but at the end of the day, only you'll know what's right for you. 

Why not ask people in your community. Attend a few classes at a few different locations and you can be the judge. The  risk is you might waste 50 minutes and $20...but within a few weeks you'll be an expert on finding the right class, style, teacher  for you. 

blissedoutnatalie likes this

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^It is a bit like that with anything that deals with health and fitness, isn't it? I know there are some people who would find my barn a little too relaxed but that's how I learn best; in a relaxed, no pressure environment with very supportive teachers. Some people - whether disabled or not - need pressure, structure and need coaches that will be on them all the time. Everyone is very different with their needs and wants. Some like slow, some like fast, some like intense, some like restorative.

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On 7/15/2016 at 8:35 PM, LarryD517 said:

There is no right answer to your question. 

One could also ask  "what should I look for in a mate?" You'll get a hundred different answers from a hundred different people, but at the end of the day, only you'll know what's right for you. 

Why not ask people in your community. Attend a few classes at a few different locations and you can be the judge. The  risk is you might waste 50 minutes and $20...but within a few weeks you'll be an expert on finding the right class, style, teacher  for you. 

I totally agree with Larry. Every teacher has a different style, energy and flavor of doing things and presenting the yoga.  Doing drop ins at various studios and getting a sampling of the yoga in the area is always a great way to start to identify what is really important for you in a teacher.  And I actually think this is the fun part! While a blessing, once students find a teacher they connect to they run the risk of ONLY going to that teacher and then losing the aspect of a variety of learning.  So I would have fun with it and make it an adventurous experience.  It may give rise to some great conversations with your son about your experiences!

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3 minutes ago, blissedoutnatalie said:

...once students find a teacher they connect to they run the risk of ONLY going to that teacher and then losing the aspect of a variety of learning.  ...

I found that out the hard way. I taught myself with a video for a few months before getting up the nerve to attend a live class. On Saturday, I would go to an Ashtanga class (during the week I'd practice at another gym on my own). It took me a few months before I realized why the classes were the same. I actually thought the instructor had OCD...LOL

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