PeterD1993

Paradigms in yoga

6 posts in this topic

     One paradigm that I am curious about is sweating.  What is your view on this matter?  I find that sweating in practice has benefits and drawbacks.  This might be stating obvious information to some, but sweating is great for your health because it serves as an outlet for our bodies to detoxify.  However, the detoxification process can produce noxious body odors.  In addition, a sweaty mat can become rather slippery; this can escalate from irritating to dangerous for yourself and neighbors as well.  

     Perhaps sweating is a fundamental paradigm in yoga that can not be dismissed.  Sweating may quite possibly be the most tangible process of purification that the human body, mind, and soul can experience.  Per haps that is why the hot yoga studios are becoming so abundant, in California at least.  I used to practice at a CorePower Yoga studio and my sweating was so outrageous that I would often have to momentarily exit the class to drink some water and cool down.  Also, my mat and towels would become so drenched that they would need to be washed immediately after practice.

     But the thing about hot yoga studios is that sweating is expected so showers, at CorePower at least, are readily available.  However, showers are not equipped at many studios, at least in the community that I reside in currently.  In addition, cleanliness is considered basic class etiquette: students are encouraged to wash their body or freshen up before coming to class and strong body odors can make it difficult for other students to focus on their practice.  Having practiced, in a hot studio for so long I was not aware that this etiquette existed.  Also practicing at a studio that lacks the privilege of having accessible showers on deck doesn't help because that means that I have to drive home all smelly.  So therefore, what is the point of taking a shower before class if I'm going to have to raise my water bill again when I get home? 

     However, I have only been practicing for a little over eighteen months.  So now that I am becoming a more seasoned yogi I have foundany practices to lack sweatiness.  Per haps, the amount of sweat produced is related to the amount of steadiness and ease in the practice.  This can go in both directions because one may need a lot of steadiness and ease to evade oversweating in a packed class or to generate sufficient internal heat to let go and break a sweat when a class is not very vigorous or is nearly a no-show.  Nonetheless, I have found sweating to trigger samadhi or frustration for myself or others.  And although it may feel good to make it through a class sweat, is a class even worth the money if you don't sweat?  

    However, I am curious as to how other yogis view and experience sweating in yoga.  How about in regards to other people sweating? Taking into consideration that men sweat more than women, but more women practice yoga in the United States than men.  What is your honest opinion?  Have you ever been offended by another students  sweating and body odor?  How did that experience make you feel?  Are there any other paradigms in yoga that you would like to discuss?

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I have the opposite viewpoint about heavy sweating. I am able to practice very effectively at 65 Fahrenheit. I will leave it at that. Go down 2-3 pages in this link to the temperature section.

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Quote from the link: The western fashion of keeping all windows closed in sweltering temperatures so that you can see puddles of sweat on the floor is surprising, considering that I have never seen a yoga room in India that even had closeable windows.

Another link here http://hotyogascience.org/

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Wow thank you.  I had no idea that sweat may be considered, by some, to be a vital fluid, per se.  I wonder how prevalent this is?  I figured that it was common knowledge that sweat does release toxins from the body?  If not then is it unhealthy to use a sauna or steam room?

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I am not sure I understand your questions but sweat is the water in our body. A lack of water is dehydration and many bad health effects. If I have to start planning 1 day ahead of time and drink very large amounts of water just to survive 1 hour yoga I'm not going to do that. I don't understand why to have the temperature so hot.

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But doesn't drinking more water simply solve that problem?  I wonder about the necessity of temperature as well.  Raising the temperature of the room will surely make heavy sweating more likely to occur and possibly dehydration or fainting.  Where as, a heavily packed class that is unheated may produce a similar effect although not nearly as severe.  And in a small class one may need generate a lot of internal heat through pranayama and more vigorous flows to even break a sweat.  It is intriguing to look at anothers point of view on such a paradigm in yoga.

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I personally think sweating feels amazing. I don't usually do hot yoga or Bikram, but I do work up a sweat in my own practice and it feels great. I just make sure to drink more water to make up for the lost fluids.

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