Maria

Jumping Back To Chaturanga?

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I'm curious to hear how you've been taught to jump back to chaturanga dandasana. I've noticed that there are two different techniques: jumping first to plank and then lowering down to chaturanga or jumping directly to chaturanga with elbows bent to 90 degrees.

 

I've been instructed to do the latter in order to protect the shoulder joint and the lower back. Any thoughts?

afriske, Nix and yogafire like this

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I have also been instructed to do the latter (jumping directly to chaturanga). I have no problems jumping from a squatted position to standing (and then directly half forward bend) but I ain't jumping to chaturanga I "walk" I'll do anything but that is just too scary for me somehow.

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If you are jumping back, you should be going directly into chatarunga, the action of bending the arms helps to absorb some of the shock (at least that's how it's been explained to me)

 

I have never been *taught* jumping back to plank, but I see it all the time and I think I even did it when I first started practicing. I think the reason is that a lot of teachers cue walking back to chatarunga the first time through, then just start saying "walk or jump back to chatarunga" without explaining "walk to your plank and lower down, or jump directly into chatarunga"  I hate seeing people jump into a plank it always looks so painful & it drives me nuts when a teacher doesnt correct it. But if you hear "walk or jump" it makes total sense to walk or jump to plank.

 

Maybe I should have taken this response over to the "yoga pet peeves" thread.  Haha I didn't anticipate the rant that was coming.

yogafire, Meugenio, afriske and 1 other like this

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I've been instructed in class to jump straight to chaturanga for the same reasons you cited, but it took me a while to get it. When I first started jumping back I was doing it to high plank, not really meaning to, but I think I didn't have the confidence in my tricep strength to land in chaturanga. Also I think my timing was off in that I wasn't bending my arms soon enough. Once I started jumping straight into chaturanga, I realized how much better (springier and less jarring) it feels.

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I was taught that it's OK to jump back to plank BUT you have to have some bend in the arms. Which I guess makes you maybe 10% of the way to chaturana

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Interesting, I've always jumped into plank and then lowered.  This is what some of the teachers I've had cued us to do. I think I'm also used to this sequence from doing burpees.  Though for me it also depends on what pose I'm jumping back from.  If I'm starting from crow I seem to naturally land in chaturanga but if I'm starting from a forward fold I jump into plank and then come down.  

 

I don't really understand why jumping back into a chaturanga would be less stressful on your shoulders or back than plank.  I actually just played around with both variations for a few minutes and it seems to me that both transitions could result in jamming up your low back if you don't engage your core.  

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After reading this thread I was more mindful of how I jumped back and realized that I certainly jumped first into plank.  I tried jumping straight into chaturanga and would you believe it actually felt more natural although it was scary at first.  Thanks OP for this thread :)

Melanie, afriske and Maria like this

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I learned the same as dianeteresa - jumping back to plank. I even double-checked that I wasn't misinterpreting by watching a sun salutation sequence that my teacher recorded for yoga journal.  I suspect it's because when we transition out of warrior I, we place our hands back down and step back to plank, and then lower.  

 

But now that I know this variation, I think I'll transition to chaturanga to lessen impact on my elbow joints and to ensure they aren't locked. 

 

Great discussion, thanks for bringing this up as a question!

afriske likes this

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Bumping up this thread since there was a recent question that reminded me of this thread.  While researching some more, I posed my hypothesis on that these differences may be style specific or adaptation here.

Edited by yogafire
more relevant material in another post
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