Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Jasmine

Wide Legged Forward Fold D

9 posts in this topic

I'm wondering if anyone can help me when it comes to forward folds which require legs separated. Approx 10 or so months ago I felt an awful snapping sensation during a class during this posture, and the instructor told me it was my hamstring where it meets the sit bone. I couldn't tell you what I did wrong because I'm really not sure! I had been doing the posture fine for some time with my forehead easily touching the mat, then one day my leg just decided to give out.

 

Anyway, after 10 months I feel I'm recovered enough to start with these again, usually when they come up on one of Candace's videos or in a class I just very gently touch the floor with my fingertips rather than go all the way down because I am so scared of it happening again  :lol:

 

I feel the insides of my hamstrings need a good stretch after taking so long for the injury to recover, but once I've given them a good stretch - have you got any pointers on these sorts of postures in order to avoid injury.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Jasmine, I am not sure how I found myself in such a long ago topic. How are the hamstrings now? I wish I had know about this 6 or 18 months ago. If treated properly it is maybe 2 - 3 weeks to a good recovery.  :( I'm so sorry. If left untreated it can go on for a year or several years. It is still worthwhile (and easy) to work on this so it doesn't happen again. I feel so bad you went through all that time and it wasn't necessary.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm still too scared to try this posture properly because I still feel a slight flinch in the same spot and am so frightened of it snapping again! I'm happy to do all sorts of other hamstring stretches, even the splits on that side, but there is something about this particular posture that my butt/top of hamstring does not like!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This problem will persist for a very long time if not dealt with. So we want to work on making forward folding safer. An extra benefit is the hamstrings and attachment points will become stronger at the same time. And fortunately it is very easy to do.
 
With standing forward folds always begin by bending at the knees at least a small amount. We are attempting to engage the hamstrings all the way through the fold. During the fold never leave the arms overhead, do not have the arms reaching forward during the fold. The weight of outstretched arms places much more leverage and strain on the hamstrings. Simply bring the arms into prayer or out to the sides during the fold. Once at the deepest point of the fold it is fine to straighten the legs but only do what is comfortable. This is for all standing folds. And it has to continue outside of yoga class as well, tie shoes, pick up something from the floor.
 
With seated forward folds it is important to do the opposite, keep the legs straight during the fold. Press down into the heels to activate the legs. Concentrate on folding at the hips and only to a comfortable depth in the pose.
 
Now you said the most problem is with wide-legged folds so you may wish to concentrate on those with the above advice. As that is slightly different action in those muscles.
 
Squats are very good for strengthening as well. Maybe when you are tying your shoes or picking something from the floor you may want to squat instead of folding with slightly bent legs.
 
Everything I have wrote here should result in less pain and more comfort. It sounds like you are past the point of pain with this. So the work now is to slightly change forward folding to improve and strengthen. It may seem like you are practicing a more beginner version of the poses but that is good.
 
And always remember it is up to you to decide if this is working good for you or not. Only work in a range that is comfortable and don’t push into pain. Maybe after a month you should notice quite a change in the feelings from forward folding.
 
If you wish to look into this more try “avulsion periosteum  ischial tuberosity” that is a tear at the sit bones. You will find some very technical medical information. At one time ‘rest’ was recommended but that is wrong and you know the outcome of that.
YogaByCandace and Jasmine like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

oh awesome, thank you very much. I'll definitely be looking further into the tear at the sit bones and modifying my forward fold. I always feel like a 'beginner' doing it now anyway because I'm too frightened to go all the way into it. 

YogaByCandace likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jasmine are you able to give an update for this? I think I read in another topic this problem continues for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you! It still feels funny when I exercise, though when I try to do the posture itself bending my knees and simply not pushing myself has helped me immensely with not feeling afraid and not feeling like it will snap again. I definitely feel it when doing things like weighted squats and in yoga during glute stretches. I wonder if stretching it is good, or led to the problem in the first place. It's bearable enough to live with, my main fear is re-injuring it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, that is very good to hear.

The weighted squats, you have to stop doing that for a long time, many months or more. Gentle squats are good, adding weight adds too much stress.

Glute stretches sound like forward folds of some type. Bend the knees going into standing folds, then straighten the legs gently. For seated folds straight legs and press into the heals same as my long reply above. As soon as you feel that sensation in the hamstring attachment you have to stop. Use gentler poses or less deep versions of the poses.

 

The original problem was from an imbalance in the overall hamstring area. And not using those muscles properly, strength vs flexibility. That is why we are changing that now.

 

When I read a different post of yours I started freaking out thinking that something went horribly wrong. I wondered how I could have messed it up that much, it's a fairly simple problem. So I tried to do some research to double check myself. I found this and it is the same as I wrote.

http://chintamaniyoga.com/asana/yoga-therapy-for-hamstring-injuries/

It is likely very worthwhile to read. And the woman who wrote it is a yoga therapist from Australia! Maybe she is close to you? If not I am sure she would be able to put you in contact with a good teacher in your area that can help you. At this point I think it might be best to find a yoga teacher that is knowledgeable about this type of injury. A little extra personal help would be a very good thing to do.

Jasmine likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks so much for your help. When I originally had a bit of a read about this all of the information tends to agree with you in that I need to be bending at the knees to protect it. I recall when i did it I simply went forward and straightened the legs as much as I could. I guess with bending my knees and straightening slowly at least I can tell when it's going to pkay up and stop when I need.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0