YogaByCandace

What books have changed your life?

15 posts in this topic

Ok changing your life is kind of intense, but if you had to pick only one book that was a game-changer for you, what would you choose? Doesn't necessarily have to be about yoga, or even very serious. Just an all-time great read, or maybe something that had a major impact. I'll start.  (PS, I realize this is crazy hard to just pick one!)

 

A heartbreaking work of staggering genius by Dave Eggers. It is a laugh out loud funny and painfully sad memoir, written so beautifully in this stream-of-consciousness style that mirrors exactly how I think. 

 

 

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To me it would have to be "Momo" by Michel Ende ,ever since I read it years and years ago, it has really stuck with me has taught me to see everyday in a different way , really great novel.

"Time is life itself, and life resides in the human heart."

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Now, I'm not sure if this is a life changing book, but it's a book that has changed the way I think. Freakonomics (the movie is great too, but there's more in the book). It's a very basic intro to Game Theory which is a branch of economics and I'm a total geek. I find that whenever I pick it up it reminds me to think a different way - I recommend it to everyone :) 

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Bar none, it would be the teachings of J. Krishnamurti that are compiled into "Think on these Things". I read that book in 1999, and it inspired met to live in a manner that was in absolute sync with my core values. For me and during that period of my life it meant giving up everything I owned and dropping out of Purdue (despite being on the Deans' List) to become homeless and serve others via social justice activism. Not that Krishnamurti encourages that explicitly, but his words resonated about the importance of authenticity. I actually blogged about this not that long ago. Oh, and though I didn't realize it for many years, what I was reading was yoga! Go figure ;)

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On 27 July 2015 at 15:12:33, KristiSmithYoga said:

Bar none, it would be the teachings of J. Krishnamurti that are compiled into "Think on these Things". I read that book in 1999, and it inspired met to live in a manner that was in absolute sync with my core values. For me and during that period of my life it meant giving up everything I owned and dropping out of Purdue (despite being on the Deans' List) to become homeless and serve others via social justice activism. Not that Krishnamurti encourages that explicitly, but his words resonated about the importance of authenticity. I actually blogged about this not that long ago. Oh, and though I didn't realize it for many years, what I was reading was yoga! Go figure ;)

I'm going to give this book a read - although pretty sure I don't need any major life changes right now - this year has been ridiculously difficult enough! ?

Cheesy but The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho. I first picked it up 12 years ago when my life was going in an unplanned, but unexpectedly amazing, way. It taught me to live in the moment and enjoy it. I'm still trying - it's not easy - but I don't worry about things not going to plan anymore. ?

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1. The Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle: I spent the summer after high school in Spain with my best friend and we stayed at her uncles house in Barcelona. We spent a ton of time on the beach, but when it rained, he had a big book collection, so we decided to curl up with a book. I grabbed "The Power of Now". It was a real page turner, every paragraph had more inspiration for me to live in the moment. That book lit a spark in me that allowed me to finally open back up to the world after a pretty traumatizing couple of years of living in anxiety.

2. Man's Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankl: This is a heartwrenching read, but in the most beautiful way. It's a man's accound of the concentration camps during the holocaust, but rather than focusing on all the death and tragedy, he focuses on the reason anyone even survived it. When you stop to think about it - it's incredible some of the things people can endure when they have a purpose. The premise is that those who survived felt they had a purpose; their lives had meaning. In a time of my life where I was battling some pretty intense depression, I found this book to be a real wake up call.

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Not a single book, or non-fiction ether, but I did find the writings of Terry Pratchett to be a sauce of ideas that lead to other things I've done. Discworld is such a varied series.

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I've read so many books that sometimes it's hard to keep track of them, but I guess that's one of the few problems with being an extremely avid reader! Atlas Shrugged was an incredible book! I don't know about a game changer, but the entire time I was reading it I was totally enthralled by the concepts in the book.

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10 hours ago, scottcraft said:

I've read so many books that sometimes it's hard to keep track of them, but I guess that's one of the few problems with being an extremely avid reader! Atlas Shrugged was an incredible book! I don't know about a game changer, but the entire time I was reading it I was totally enthralled by the concepts in the book.

Awesome!

It didn't change my life, either, since I had agreed with and already understood much, if not all, of her prophecy/philosophy (well, at least the stuff that didn't fly over my head!). But (you're not supposed to start a sentence with the word But, right?), it was the most meaningful, powerful and important book I'd ever picked up. If it matches one's way of thinking, it provides reinforcement and clarity. If, however, one see things from a different angle, it enlightens and shows a new approach to seeing the world. 

It presented a vivid depiction of concepts, many of which aren't easy to articulate (for example, NOT a spoiler...the demise of the car company, the effects of the regulations, etc). We'd all be better off as a nation if everyone read it.

Realizing I missed much, I read it a second time and added a third reading to my bucket list (along with being able to clasp my hands in Cow Face pose). I, sort of, gave up half way through the third reading, though, but will pick it up again. I've corresponded with people that have read it ten times.

I strongly urge you to read her quasi-autobiography ‘We The Living", which will help you understand the foundation of her thinking. Seeing from whence she came reinforces the authority for her to speak.  I didn't enjoy (nor really get) "The Fountainhead"

You can try her novella "Anthem" which, at 39? pages can be read in one sitting. It dovetails with Atlas and provides a comically ironic mirror, considering the length of the speech.

 

Who is John Galt?

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On 7/27/2015, 9:12:33, KristiSmithYoga said:

Bar none, it would be the teachings of J. Krishnamurti that are compiled into "Think on these Things". I read that book in 1999, and it inspired met to live in a manner that was in absolute sync with my core values. For me and during that period of my life it meant giving up everything I owned and dropping out of Purdue (despite being on the Deans' List) to become homeless and serve others via social justice activism. Not that Krishnamurti encourages that explicitly, but his words resonated about the importance of authenticity. I actually blogged about this not that long ago. Oh, and though I didn't realize it for many years, what I was reading was yoga! Go figure ;)

Wow, Kristi.  What courage it took for you to take such a leap.  I admire you for it.

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Every time I finish a great book, I feel like it changes me.  More accurately, I feel like I've grown in some way either intellectually or emotionally.  Sometimes the timing of reading the book is relevant, as in this case.  I just finished reading Sarah's Key.  I believe this book hit me more poignantly because of my recent trip to Paris.  The characters were beautifully and maddeningly human.  The story was painful to read, but the sub-themes helped to, if not lighten the mood, then at least distract from it some times.  It was shocking to learn such an important part of history that was never taught in my schools.  The events of this book made me look at WWII and France in a more complex light.  This novel also made sense of some of the personal-to-Paris memorials that were a bit mysterious to me during my recent wanderings.  I plan to read another by Tatiana de Rosnay very soon.  

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For me, the ultimate book is  "The Little Prince"  (or "Le Petit Prince").

It's an extremely easy read, but in between the lines there's so much truth about what's truly important in life and it makes you really reconsider the things you think are important in your life. I read a couple of pages every time I can't sleep at night.

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It is your acting not only reading that will get you the best results. These 2 books gave me the framework that I need to take action.

1. The Alchemist – by Paulo Coelho
2. 7 Habits Of Highly Effective People – by Stephen R. Covey

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The Snowball: Warren Buffett and the Business of Life by Alice Schroeder
The Intelligent Investor by Benjamin Graham
Der Prozeß by Franz Kafka

 

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