Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Mani13a

Breathing

6 posts in this topic

Hi!!

I've been doing yoga on and off but just recently, I've been more serious about it. But, I've always had a hard time with my breathing. As in I don't know when to inhale or exhale or if I'm doing it right.

Any tips?

Thanks in advance!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The short answer is...if you attend a class, your instructor will help.

If you're attempting self teaching, you might consider http://yogabycandace.com/blog/how-to-breathe-better or  yoga breathing techniques 

A lot can be learned from watching YouTube demonstrations, most leaders will announce the breath needed. Other than Candace's wonderful library https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCI9s9nFu2m3K2CvhO2QVfTg , an internet search for any video lead by Kino (just add in the name to your search) will, similarly, show and describe the proper breath

Each muscle exertion corresponds with an inhale, the muscle relaxation corresponds with an exhalation

In Sun Saltuations, each move corresponds with one, or the other, hands up Inhale (I), forward fold Exhale (E), Half way lift (I), fold (E), Jump or step back to high plank (I), Chatturanga (E), Upward dog/cobra (I), Downward Dog (E), Hop or step forward (I), Fold (E), Half way lift (I), Fold (E), Mountain (I), etc. (caveat, I made have messed that up a little, but that's the essence, each move is done with a specific breath)

Same for others...Cat (I) Cow (E), etc.

Best advice...attend a class or take a lesson

 

Others will respond with (presumably) better advice. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Attending class will be your best option as @LarryD517 said. But another basic hint, which is true most of the time, is Inhale = Extend/Expand; Exhale = Contract/Release

For Example in Cat Cow: Cow pose is a deep expansion of the chest/front body - Inhale. Cat pose is a deep contraction in the core - Exhale.

Same goes for any core related posed, you'll notice that when you breathe actively, that the core naturally contracts on the exhale, therefore if you're doing yogic bicycles, or any other core work, it's the exhale that should help you through the most intense core contraction.

 

Looch and yogafire like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, brenskip55 said:

But another basic hint, which is true most of the time, is Inhale = Extend/Expand; Exhale = Contract/Release

For Example in Cat Cow: Cow pose is a deep expansion of the chest/front body - Inhale. Cat pose is a deep contraction in the core - Exhale.

Same goes for any core related posed, you'll notice that when you breathe actively, that the core naturally contracts on the exhale, therefore if you're doing yogic bicycles, or any other core work, it's the exhale that should help you through the most intense core contraction.

 

I use this rule, and it's natural for weight lifting too - exhale on contraction / exertion, then inhale when lowering the weights. I think the rule that exhale can be both contract and / or release - the release times are what Larry meant by "muscle relaxation".  It's important to engage muscles at all times but breathe through it - for instance, chaturanga is done while exhaling, but the muscles are not relaxed.

No wonder the breath is so confusing. I think in some classes, the teacher preferred to do what Larry had said - Cat on inhale, Cow on exhale. But for the other times, when I round up to cat, I push my hands down and lift up - that's exertion in my arms and contraction in my core, so I exhale.

I think it depends if you are doing uddiyana bandha yet in your practice (not expected in the beginning!).  If you're belly breathing, you won't feel the natural contraction in your core when you exhale during cat.

For sun salutations, don't feel compelled to do the one movement per breath (inhale or exhale). Just a few weeks ago, my breath was rather shallow that day, and I was literally getting out of breath just doing suns. My teacher advised for me to go ahead and take an extra breath in between before moving to the next movement.

robert likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0