notlulamae

Ideas To Get A Man Into Yoga!

39 posts in this topic

... I try to practice with my eyes closed.

 

You're kidding me...I practice with my eyes wide open (yoga pants are a godsend!...oops...I hope no women are reading this...LOL)

 

Seriously, I think most guys are not as flexible as the gals and are quickly intimidated or turned off.

 

Making matters worse, the typical guy, new to yoga, jumps in and tries to quickly force a stretch, thinking they can power through it.

This results in the muscles fighting back preventing the stretch...thus, unfortunately, many just give up.

 

...Stretching your hamstrings is a bit like leading a reluctant mule. If you pull the mule, it will pull back. But you can coax the mule along if you make friends with it. Help the beast relax, give it a nice place to go, and it will happily follow you.

So it is with your hamstrings. If you stretch by yanking on them, they’ll only yank back harder. But you can coax them to loosen up if you set them at ease and treat them right.....

From a great, but lengthy, article on hamstring stretches http://www.yogajournal.com/article/practice-section/long-and-strong/ 

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Maybe some classes or videos that incorporate upper body strength could help? I agree larryd, I tend to find in my classes the women are super bendy compared to the men in the class and this could possibly be part of the reason men are struggling to get involved, but I remember how long it took me to get crow pose and my husband did it straight away!!! He's always telling me I'm "better" at yoga because I have flexible legs, but that's just one aspect. 

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I tried to get my husband to do yoga at home with me. He got through one meditation and did not return. I only have one mat right now and like my blanket hoginess (not a word, I know) I am a mat hog. So he agreed that when I get him a mat he will do it with me.

I just think it would be nice to have something new to do together. Also I feel more committed when I have someone doing it with me and that hope of AcroYoga is always there :D 

I just hope he lives up to this promise. He has no motivation other than me wanting him to do it and he doesn't play any sports. Any suggestions?

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I tried to get my husband to do yoga at home with me. He got through one meditation and did not return. I only have one mat right now and like my blanket hoginess (not a word, I know) I am a mat hog. So he agreed that when I get him a mat he will do it with me.

I just think it would be nice to have something new to do together. Also I feel more committed when I have someone doing it with me and that hope of AcroYoga is always there :D

I just hope he lives up to this promise. He has no motivation other than me wanting him to do it and he doesn't play any sports. Any suggestions?

What about making it like a date, and maybe every week or every other week doing something that the other wants to do - and when it's your turn to choose, you pick yoga?   :D You could also maybe sign up for a partner yoga or acroyoga workshop? That's really fun and lighthearted

KelliAlaska and YogiRishi like this

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Reading some of the above posts about husbands doing Yoga in secret begs some questions.

 

Why do we as men feel we have to do Yoga in secret?

I do it at home, yet do not allow anyone to see me doing it.  The whole family knows I do it, I even talk about it and promote it...but behind closed doors I go.

 

Does it seem that we are somehow less of a man or something? or being perceived less manly? 

Why do we fear going to a class? I know I do, but cannot put a finger on as to why. I never feared going to Aerobic classes filled with mostly women in the past. So why...shrug.

 

My fears all have to do with being judged for my shabby appearance and complete lack of coordination, flexibility, and skill. I've always been an unrepentant ponce and have never paid much mind to how manly I'm being in any particular moment.

 

I don't let my family know I practice yoga because I know they'll judge me negatively for it and I don't have the energy to try yet again to explain myself to them. 

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Its interesting reading this topic because I wish I had ways to convince my female friends to join me in yoga!  :lol:

Jasmine likes this

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What about making it like a date, and maybe every week or every other week doing something that the other wants to do - and when it's your turn to choose, you pick yoga?   :D You could also maybe sign up for a partner yoga or acroyoga workshop? That's really fun and lighthearted

I never thought of that. Thank you, I think once we get him a mat things will work out better too. But that is great advice if he ever starts to flake lol.

YogaByCandace likes this

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My fears all have to do with being judged for my shabby appearance and complete lack of coordination, flexibility, and skill. I've always been an unrepentant ponce and have never paid much mind to how manly I'm being in any particular moment.

 

I don't let my family know I practice yoga because I know they'll judge me negatively for it and I don't have the energy to try yet again to explain myself to them. 

stop worrying about what other people think...I guarantee you that the other people in the class won't notice you (their heads are upside down looking at the mat half the time, ...everyone appreciates the struggles of a beginner and admires the courage...go for it

 

as to your family, if they're going to try and make fun of you, just flip them the bird or a hurl a few expletives their way and say "I'm trying to better myself...maybe you might consider the same"

YogaByCandace likes this

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When I started training for my first marathon I met people who had ran several who told me how valuable yoga was to the body surviving years of running abuse. It has and remains incredibly difficult. But it is something I now couldn't imagine living without.

MrBalloonHands likes this

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I've dragged my husband to a few vinyasa flow classes before, and he was miserable because he couldn't get comfortable - he can't sit cross-legged and classes often begin and end in this position. In hindsight, he could have sat on a bolster to modify it, but we weren't instructed to get any props at the beginning of class and were caught empty handed. Also, he's a former national level bodybuilder and views yoga primarily as a form of exercise. Because of this view, he isn't impressed at how he doesn't work up much of a sweat or get an endorphin rush.

 

I am trying to get him to try an Ashtanga class...*fingers crossed*

 

I think that teachers who take a brief moment to ask "new faces" entering the studio whether they are new to yoga and if they have any substantial flexibility issues [such as the inability to sit cross-legged and/or touch their toes after warming up] can have an enormous effect on whether these people have a positive experience and return. It only takes a few seconds to instruct how to use a bolster to elevate the hips, or to bend their knees (or use blocks) when forward folding, and this can be done for the whole group - not just one-on-one.

 

I know that a lot of teachers already do this, but not all of them do.

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I've dragged my husband to a few vinyasa flow classes before, and he was miserable because he couldn't get comfortable - he can't sit cross-legged and classes often begin and end in this position. In hindsight, he could have sat on a bolster to modify it, but we weren't instructed to get any props at the beginning of class and were caught empty handed. Also, he's a former national level bodybuilder and views yoga primarily as a form of exercise. Because of this view, he isn't impressed at how he doesn't work up much of a sweat or get an endorphin rush.

 

I am trying to get him to try an Ashtanga class...*fingers crossed*

 

I think that teachers who take a brief moment to ask "new faces" entering the studio whether they are new to yoga and if they have any substantial flexibility issues [such as the inability to sit cross-legged and/or touch their toes after warming up] can have an enormous effect on whether these people have a positive experience and return. It only takes a few seconds to instruct how to use a bolster to elevate the hips, or to bend their knees (or use blocks) when forward folding, and this can be done for the whole group - not just one-on-one.

 

I know that a lot of teachers already do this, but not all of them do.

Perhaps practice at home first to open up the hips and then go to a tougher class?

KristiSmithYoga likes this

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Perhaps practice at home first to open up the hips and then go to a tougher class?

Good idea! We've talked about "trading" yoga instruction for personal training (I could use some more upper body strength for arm balances, after all) :48:

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Good idea! We've talked about "trading" yoga instruction for personal training (I could use some more upper body strength for arm balances, after all) :48:

Great! Let us know how it goes :)

KristiSmithYoga likes this

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