msinkblot

Elbow burn in forearm stand

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I have gotten comfortable doing forearm stand and forearm variations and I really enjoy them now (quite a development from thinking they are impossible!), but I have severe burn on my elbows!  My fiancé has been applying industrial strength balm to help it heal. Am I the only one suffering from really dry skin and scrapped elbows?  I never hear about mat burn in all my research online. -_- 

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I've definitely experienced this when I've practiced on carpet before. But never on my mat. Of course, I hardly practice forearm stand unless I'm feeling super feisty! Sounds very uncomfortable!

msinkblot likes this

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Dry skin could be part of the problem. They are forearm stands not elbow stands. It is really important to keep the weight pushing down into the wrists (press into the inner side of the wrists) and spread evenly, in full contact with the ground.

msinkblot likes this

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That's both very helpful! I have always had dry elbows (and kind of bony wrists/elbows) ever since I was young, so this hasn't helped at all. I'll pay attention to distribute more weight into wrists. 

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I tried it again and I realize I have a tendency to find it hard to put weight on my wrists. I have very big hands and my thumb has a tendency to pick up. I realize this is an issue I have in any arm balance too- I try my best to push weight into the fingers and thumb but inevitably I find this hard. Anyone face something similar?

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@msinkblotthat is very common! Just means you need to continue to build strength in the proper alignment. Try practicing more dolphin and downward dog with strong focus on keeping that forefinger knuckle rooted fairly down!

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You can try this link http://www.sensational-yoga-poses.com/pincha-mayurasana.html for some very good instructions. Just like Brenna says the downward dog and dolphin are in there. 

It talks about bringing the hands together initially to help with correct alignment in the shoulders. And many other helpful ideas.

You should be aware that the prerequisite poses for the first forearm balance - Pincha Mayurasana are Kapotasana and Dwi Pada Shirshasana. Nobody seems to know this or follow this. I found out the hard way, now I have very tight movement in my upper back which I must do a great deal of work to correct.

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Do your elbows tend to splay out when you get into forearm stand? It could just be that you need to develop a stronger base. As others suggested, lots f dolphin pose, perhaps even work with a strap around your arms to keep them from splaying (and thus burning) .
Maybe wear long sleeves?
Perhaps pictures would be helpful in order to check out your form :)

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Sounds good! Thanks everyone. :) I don't have a picture of forearm stand but I have been recording my scorpion practice. I'll attach a picture of that and maybe forearm later (it's difficult for me to do "selfie poses" so I usually get my partner to do it). This is in scorpion quite recently. I don't think my arms splay out as I try to suck the energy up so I don't collapse onto my arms and it feels lighter that way. I also work on lengthening my spine so I keep some energy into my legs and core. I feel quite stable and not so heavy. 

12669223_10153290300980286_223720048_o.jpg

robert likes this

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On 08-02-2016 at 0:41 PM, Anahata said:

You can try this link http://www.sensational-yoga-poses.com/pincha-mayurasana.html for some very good instructions. Just like Brenna says the downward dog and dolphin are in there. 

It talks about bringing the hands together initially to help with correct alignment in the shoulders. And many other helpful ideas.

You should be aware that the prerequisite poses for the first forearm balance - Pincha Mayurasana are Kapotasana and Dwi Pada Shirshasana. Nobody seems to know this or follow this. I found out the hard way, now I have very tight movement in my upper back which I must do a great deal of work to correct.

 

I often wonder how the process of deciding which poses are prerequisites to which poses came to be. Sometimes the process feels very obvious - one pose will help you build strength and flexibility which the other pose calls for, but sometimes I don't see the connection at all. Then again, I feel that each person's anatomy, as well as our unique backgrounds and personalities, will also dictate the path to whichever asana we want to incorporate to  practice.

In this particular case, I can see how kapotasana would help, but dwi pada shirshasana ... if I was told I must be able to do that pose before even trying to do pincha mayurasana I'd be tempted to quit yoga altogether, or at the very least I'd rule out pincha mayurasana for a long, long time. To me, a prerequisite pose shouldn't look more unattainable than the end goal pose.

yogafire and msinkblot like this

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Interesting point @Hildegard I also found Pincha Mayurasana easier than Dwi Pada and Kapotasana- both came to me *after* forearm. I find Forearm is more a matter of shoulder stability / rotation / strength. Kapotasana is still a difficult one for me I don't do often because that part of my body is just opening up. I actually find Scorpion forearm balance easier than Kapotasana. I feel Dwi Pada also requires a LOT of flexibility + strength. I tried it yesterday for the first time since a long time (I don't usually go there... because I'm not feeling adventurous unless I have a ton of heat) after feeling comfortable in my Pincha (can maintain it for some time without feeling tired) and it is actually much easier now. I think each body is different with each of our own strengths and weaknesses and often, using  your gut feeling about which parts of your body are stronger or more open is a better gage. You know your body best in the end.

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21 hours ago, Hildegard said:

 

I often wonder how the process of deciding which poses are prerequisites to which poses came to be. Sometimes the process feels very obvious - one pose will help you build strength and flexibility which the other pose calls for, but sometimes I don't see the connection at all. Then again, I feel that each person's anatomy, as well as our unique backgrounds and personalities, will also dictate the path to whichever asana we want to incorporate to  practice.

In this particular case, I can see how kapotasana would help, but dwi pada shirshasana ... if I was told I must be able to do that pose before even trying to do pincha mayurasana I'd be tempted to quit yoga altogether, or at the very least I'd rule out pincha mayurasana for a long, long time. To me, a prerequisite pose shouldn't look more unattainable than the end goal pose.

I have found almost no information available on the prerequisites. Except it seems to be correct. I had to type out the information below from my book 'Ashtanga Yoga The Intermediate Series: Mythology, Anatomy, and Practice By Gregor Maehle' It's all I have. And like I said it really seems to be correct. So many things in yoga that are not well known. 

"Students need to be proficient in Kapotasana before starting arm balances. If the humeri (upper arm bone) cannot be flexed enough to grab one’s feet while arching back on the knees, arm balances will only stiffen the shoulders.

When balancing on one’s arms, the spine and abdomen need to be firm and steady enough to hold the weight of the legs and pelvis without dropping into a backbend; this could injure the shoulder joints. Proficiency in Dvipada Shirshasana indicates that this firmness has been achieved."
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