Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
AnandaYoga

Struggling in YTT

7 posts in this topic

So, I'm in week 4 of my 12 week teacher training.  My first class is on April 18!!!! I am so nervous, and I feel so unprepared.  I expected my teaching voice to come naturally, I consider myself an advanced yoga practitioner and I thought that would translate to being a great teacher...but boy does it not.  Students do not care if I can do scorpion, handstand, or grasshopper. They only want me to lead them through an hour of yoga.   This is probably such a duh thing for most people, but I truly didn't think I would have such a hard time finding my teaching voice.  Definitely a very humbling experience and an ego check.  I'm really struggling with what to say during the silent parts, like when they are resting in down dog for 5 breaths.  It just goes silent and is so awkward, my mind goes blank and I can't remember ANY cues.  I would so appreciate any advice that anyone has to offer, I'm really losing sleep over this. :/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't stress! We've all been there. Finding your voice is probably the hardest part of the training, and honestly, I didn't really find my true voice until I had already been out in the world teaching. It takes time for everyone - you're not alone!

And I know exactly what you're talking about with the silent moments - try to just allow the silence to be. If you find that it feels unnatural and awkward, you can even play around with cuing it - "Stay here and find comfort in the sound of just your own breath" or something like that. It allows people to understand that there will be a silent moment, but that doesn't mean to lose focus. It's also a good reminder for YOU to breathe and relax. I like to cue my students to refocus by telling them selves "I am breathing in, I am breathing out" and I also use that for myself as well.

Stick with it and don't lose sleep over it. Teacher training was much more difficult in actuality than I ever imagined it would be when I signed up. But you get through it. And when you're done, you'll have accomplished such a wonderful thing! So allow yourself to let go a bit - it's ok to make mistakes - it's how we learn! 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That was really, really helpful thank you!! It seems like everyone else is just so natural at it, but that may be my own perception.  The lead instructor is begging me to breathe when I teach and I find that SO hard because there's already so much going on in my head, how dare you ask me to breathe?? ;)

You are so right that it's way more difficult than you imagine.  In many ways, too...mentally, physically, and spiritually.  I'm absolutely going to be a totally changed person after this!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep - I find that in general, in life, it's always about remembering to breathe. I tend to get nervous and talk to quickly, because time seems to go so slowly when you're in front of a room of students. So I tell myself before each class that my challenge is to slow down and savor the transition - the space between each breath, the space between each cue.

And it comes with practice. :) And yes! You will be a completely changed person when you come out. If you thought a yoga high was awesome. The yoga teacher training high is even better!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the most popular comments I get on my YouTube channel is praise for NOT talking so much. If you have a class around a particular theme, or you're feeling very passionate about an off the mat lesson that you're applying on the mat (or vice versa), then by all means, sing that lesson loud and proud.... but otherwise, let people soak up the silence. It's probably the one time in their day that they have some quiet. It might be uncomfortable for you and maybe even them, but find a little pocket of comfort in the discomfort. :) The other thing I used to do when I was feeling this way (believe me, we all feel this way!) is say, "We'll be here for about ten breaths." That lets them know they're going to be in silence for a while, and is a good self reminder to breathe and relax. 

 

Other things that have helped me - going to more classes and seeing what other teachers cue. Sometimes things they say are so beautiful and are something I can integrate into my teaching style. Other things, not so much. And then I also realize that as a student, I am not as critical of the teacher as when I am the teacher and am criticizing myself! It's a good way to take the pressure off yourself. 

 

Another thing I'd do when driving to teach the class would be to actually say certain things out loud in the car. Practicing the welcome, practicing the transition cues I know I often mess up - saying all those things aloud was really helpful. Stick with it - above all, practice is the best way to improve.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For what it's worth, as a yoga student I have to say I appreciate the silent moments during class and I never think they're awkward. It's important for me to know how long we'll be in a certain pose (otherwise my brain starts going into overdrive trying to guess when we'll have to move), but if I'm told we'll stay in a pose for five breaths or that the instructor will let us know when we'll move it's all good. Moments of silence during class allow me to focus on my breath once again and find my center, calm down if I'm feeling a touch upset and just be in the moment.

There's so much noise during out everyday lives that I truly appreciate the quietness you can find in so many yoga classes.

Good luck with your teacher training!

brenskip55 and yogagrammy like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

“All the air in.... and all the air out” It sounds so simple but maybe the most important thing.

“Never allow the posture to damage the breath”

I’m with Hildegard, the same.

The worst is guided Savasana! I remember one time after class a student asked the teacher a question. The teacher responded by saying weren’t you listening to what I was saying during Savasana? I thought to myself jokingly; How could we possibly been listening to anything anyone was saying! You told us to go into Savasana!

But others like things done a little differently so have to give a little of both. Good luck with your training

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0